Livelihood Baseline

Haiti Rural Livelihood Profiles

March 2015

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

A livelihood is the sum of the ways in which households support themselves from year to year and survive during hard times. There is a growing interest in the use of livelihoods analysis as a first step in gaining a better understanding of many development-related issues, ranging from emergency response and disaster mitigation to long-term development. This interest is rooted in two basic observations:

  • First, information on any given area or community can be properly interpreted only with knowledge of the environment in which people live; and
  • Second, assistance programs cannot be properly designed to fit local circumstances if planners are unfamiliar with local livelihoods and do not know whether the effects of proposed interventions will complement or clash with existing strategies.

The eight livelihood profiles presented in this report describe the main characteristics of the livelihood zones emerging from Haiti’s territorial division at a workshop for food security partners in July 2014. The data furnished in these profiles were collected using the Household Economy Analysis (HEA) approach.

Livelihood profiles are not meant to be used alone in assessing the needs of a given population or for program planning purposes. They are designed to serve as a tool providing information on the environment in which people live and as a complement to other food security data, such as monitoring data on nutrition, crop production, market prices, etc. Used in this manner, livelihood profiles help food security analysts better understand current shocks in the context of the local definition of what is normal for a given population by learning how households react to a whole series of events. The value of livelihood profiles lies in their ability to help quickly spot a developing crisis, conduct more effective, better-targeted, and more in-depth assessments, and thus help mount a more rapid response to the needs of the population in question ‒ in other words, to provide a more effective early warning. However, these profiles are not designed to provide the degree of statistical reliability or type of highly localized data so essential for the planning of local programs. 

Summary

Les huit profils de moyens d’existence présentés dans ce rapport décrivent les principales caractéristiques des zones de moyens d'existence issues du découpage du pays initié par un atelier regroupant des partenaires en juillet 2014 et un travail sur le terrain en aout-septembre 2014. Les données fournies dans ces profils ont été recueillies à l'aide de l’approche « Analyse de l'économie des ménages » (Household Economy Analysis ou HEA).

Les profils des moyens d’existence ne sont pas destinés à être utilisés de façon isolée pour évaluer les besoins des populations ou pour planifier des programmes. Ils sont conçus comme un outil qui fournit des informations sur le contexte dans lequel les populations vivent et il vient en complément d’autres données sur la sécurité alimentaire, telles que le suivi de la nutrition, la production agricole, les prix sur les marchés, etc. Utilisés de cette façon, les profils des moyens d’existence permettent à l’analyste de la sécurité alimentaire de mieux comprendre les chocs actuels dans le contexte de ce qui est localement normal pour une population donnée, en connaissant la façon dont les ménages réagissent à toute une série d’événements. Sur cette base, on est plus en mesure d’identifier à temps une crise de sécurité alimentaire potentielle chez une population cible et, par la suite, d’effectuer une évaluation et une réponse rapide, c’est-à-dire fournir une alerte précoce plus efficace. La valeur des profils des moyens d’existence réside dans le fait qu’ils aident à identifier rapidement une crise qui se développe, à mener de manière plus efficace et plus focalisée des évaluations plus approfondies, et à promouvoir ainsi une réponse plus rapide aux besoins de la population. Cependant, les profils ne sont pas conçus pour fournir le degré de confiance statistique ou encore des données hautement localisées qui revêtent une importance majeure pour la planification des programmes locaux.

About Livelihood Baseline

Livelihood Baseline provides quantifiable analysis of household livelihood options. It includes a detailed breakdown of food, cash and expenditure patterns, as well as coping capacity for various wealth groups. The baseline also highlights market patterns and constraints and opportunities for economic growth. Used for outcomes analysis, the baselines can quantify and measure the impact of shocks on households. The analysis is very useful in planning humanitarian assistance, particularly in forecasting whether and when assistance will be needed, how many people might be affected, and what types of assistance will be most helpful.

About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on some 34 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, and USGS, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica. Read more about our work.