Guatemala

Presence Country
January 2017

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance

IPC 2.0 Fase de Insegurida d Alimentaria Aguda

1: Minimo
2: Acentuada
3: Crisis
4: Emergencia
5: Hambruna
Se estima que seria al menos una fase peor sin ayuda humanitaria actual o programada

IPC 2.0 Fase de Insegurida d Alimentaria Aguda

1: Minimo
2: Acentuada
3+: Crisis o peor
Se estima que seria al menos una fase
peor sin ayuda humanitaria actual o programada

IPC 2.0 Fase de Insegurida d Alimentaria Aguda

Países presenciales:
1: Minimo
2: Acentuada
3: Crisis
4: Emergencia
5: Hambruna
Países de monitoreo remoto:
1: Minimo
2: Acentuada
3+: Crisis o peor
Se estima que seria al menos una fase
peor sin ayuda humanitaria actual o programada

IPC 2.0 Phase d'Insécurité Alimentaire Aiguë

1: Minimale
2: Stress
3: Crise
4: Urgence
5: Famine
Serait probablement pire, au moins une phase, sans l'assistance humanitaire en cours ou programmée

IPC 2.0 Phase d'Insécurité Alimentaire Aiguë

1: Minimale
2: Stress
3+: Crise ou pire
Serait probablement pire, au moins une phase, sans
l'assistance humanitaire en cours ou programmée

IPC 2.0 Phase d'Insécurité Alimentaire Aiguë

Pays de présence:
1: Minimale
2: Stress
3: Crise
4: Urgence
5: Famine
Pays suivis à distance:
1: Minimale
2: Stress
3+: Crise ou pire
Serait probablement pire, au moins une phase, sans
l'assistance humanitaire en cours ou programmée

IPC 2.0 Fase de Insegurança Alimentar Aguda Baseado

1: Minima
2: Stress
3: Crise
4: Emergência
5: Fome
Poderia ser pior sem a assistência humanitária em vigor ou programad

IPC 2.0 Fase de Insegurança Alimentar Aguda Baseado

1: Minima
2: Stress
3+: Crise ou pior
Poderia ser pior sem a assistência
humanitária em vigor ou programad

IPC 2.0 Fase de Insegurança Alimentar Aguda Baseado

Países com presença:
1: Minima
2: Stress
3: Crise
4: Emergência
5: Fome
Países sem presença:
1: Minima
2: Stress
3+: Crise ou pior
Poderia ser pior sem a assistência
humanitária em vigor ou programad
Key Messages
  • In general, staple harvests for the Postrera season and for the single season in the Western Highlands (altiplano) were better than in 2015, which has improved availability of staple foods in markets and in producing households. However, due to erratic rainfall during the second part of the rainy season, localized crop losses were reported in lower elevation areas of the strip known as the Dry Corridor, leading to below-normal household stocks. For producers of black beans, these damages also mean lower income, since these producers typically sell part of their harvests.

  • Throughout the country, maize prices have remained below the five-year average since February 2016. With maize imports from Mexico, which complement domestic production, maize prices are expected to remain below average throughout the period of analysis. However, wholesale prices for beans in Guatemala City have registered an atypical spike since March 2016, with prices in December 2016 nearly 28 percent above average. Bean prices are expected to remain above average at least through the period of analysis, in part due to the impact of climate conditions on production during the past two years.

  • As there are no recent representative surveys available, the current prevalence of acute malnutrition in areas of greatest concern for food insecurity is unknown. However, the number of cases of acute malnutrition reported by the Ministry of Health in municipalities of San Marcos, Totonicapán, and Huehuetenango during the final months of 2016 remained stable. This generates concern for nutritional outcomes in these areas, since typically the number of reported cases of acute malnutrition decreases during these months. 

  • Many households who were affected by damages to their staple crops in 2016 and suffered significant losses due to drought in 2015 are currently Stressed (IPC Phase 2), with some populations in Crisis (IPC Phase 3). The majority of these households are located in lower elevation areas of the Dry Corridor. The number of people facing Crisis (IPC Phase 3) outcomes is expected to gradually increase until the end of the lean season in August/September 2017, with areas of the Dry Corridor in both the west and east in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) during the period.

  • With expectations for a transition from La Niña to ENSO neutral conditions in February 2017, and in the absence of other climate drivers with clear impact on the region during the period, the most likely scenario in staple-producing areas in the north of the country is for above-average to average rainfall, which is favorable for production. For the beginning of the rainy season in the rest of the country (April/May), forecasts indicate normal probabilities for cumulative rainfall, with a continuation of positive anomalies in near-surface air temperatures.

Weather, Climate, and Agriculture

Seasonal Calendar

Livelihoods

Livelihood Zone Map

Central America Food Security Outlook (July - December 2015)

Click here to view with closed captions

Guatemala SMART Survey

About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on some 35 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, and USGS, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica. Read more about our work.