Tanzania

Remotely Monitored Country
March 2017

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance

IPC 2.0 Fase de Insegurida d Alimentaria Aguda

1: Minimo
2: Acentuada
3: Crisis
4: Emergencia
5: Hambruna
Se estima que seria al menos una fase peor sin ayuda humanitaria actual o programada

IPC 2.0 Fase de Insegurida d Alimentaria Aguda

1: Minimo
2: Acentuada
3+: Crisis o peor
Se estima que seria al menos una fase
peor sin ayuda humanitaria actual o programada

IPC 2.0 Fase de Insegurida d Alimentaria Aguda

Países presenciales:
1: Minimo
2: Acentuada
3: Crisis
4: Emergencia
5: Hambruna
Países de monitoreo remoto:
1: Minimo
2: Acentuada
3+: Crisis o peor
Se estima que seria al menos una fase
peor sin ayuda humanitaria actual o programada

IPC 2.0 Phase d'Insécurité Alimentaire Aiguë

1: Minimale
2: Stress
3: Crise
4: Urgence
5: Famine
Serait probablement pire, au moins une phase, sans l'assistance humanitaire en cours ou programmée

IPC 2.0 Phase d'Insécurité Alimentaire Aiguë

1: Minimale
2: Stress
3+: Crise ou pire
Serait probablement pire, au moins une phase, sans
l'assistance humanitaire en cours ou programmée

IPC 2.0 Phase d'Insécurité Alimentaire Aiguë

Pays de présence:
1: Minimale
2: Stress
3: Crise
4: Urgence
5: Famine
Pays suivis à distance:
1: Minimale
2: Stress
3+: Crise ou pire
Serait probablement pire, au moins une phase, sans
l'assistance humanitaire en cours ou programmée

IPC 2.0 Fase de Insegurança Alimentar Aguda Baseado

1: Minima
2: Stress
3: Crise
4: Emergência
5: Fome
Poderia ser pior sem a assistência humanitária em vigor ou programad

IPC 2.0 Fase de Insegurança Alimentar Aguda Baseado

1: Minima
2: Stress
3+: Crise ou pior
Poderia ser pior sem a assistência
humanitária em vigor ou programad

IPC 2.0 Fase de Insegurança Alimentar Aguda Baseado

Países com presença:
1: Minima
2: Stress
3: Crise
4: Emergência
5: Fome
Países sem presença:
1: Minima
2: Stress
3+: Crise ou pior
Poderia ser pior sem a assistência
humanitária em vigor ou programad
Key Messages
  • While the Vuli harvest accounts for only about 20 percent of annual production in many northeast areas, the significant crop failure has left many poor households market dependent much earlier than normal. A recent FEWS NET assessment confirmed there was near total crop failure in lowland areas of Arusha, and for the region as a whole, production was approximately 25 percent of normal. In Tanga, the harvest was less than 50 percent of normal, and in Kilimanjaro, crop production was below average except in highland areas. As a result, poor households are expected to remain in Stressed (IPC Phase 2) through at least May until the Msimu harvest.

  • A resurgence of Msimu rains, from late January through mid-March, has improved rangeland resources and allowed for the production of short-cycle vegetables in drought-hit northeastern Tanzania.  However, livestock are likely to gradually recover due to the severity of the extended drought from September through January. Labor opportunities for poor households are limited by reduced planting areas following the two to three-month delay in the season onset, compounding household purchasing capacities.

  • Staple food prices, except for rice, are rising sharply and remained elevated during the Vuli harvest, restricting food access for poor households. The retail price of a kilogram of maize in Arusha market, ranged between Tsh. 950-1,000, in early March, as compared to Tsh. 600-700 during a comparable period last year. The Government of Tanzania has restricted exports of primary commodities, such as maize, beans, and rice, permitting only exports of flour and other processed products, moderating more substantive price spikes.

  • The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) indicated that as of March 12, Tanzania hosted 305,000 refugees, about 234,256 from Burundi, displaced since April 2015. The refugees are residing in Nyarugusu and Nduta camps, both at overcapacity, as well as Mtendeli camp. Significant funding constraints have led WFP to reduce food rations to 53 percent of the full value for March and April. Only one percent of the 2017 requirement is funded, compounding a 34 percent funding gap carried over from 2016. The majority of the refugees are in Stressed (IPC Phase 2!) in the presence of humanitarian assistance, but those, who arrived after Vuli planting, are in Crisis (IPC Phase 3).  

Weather, Climate, and Agriculture

Seasonal Calendar

Livelihoods

Livelihoods Zone Narrative

About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on some 34 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, and USGS, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica. Read more about our work.