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Presence Country
Key Message Update

Refugee arrivals from DRC into Uganda continue to increase

January 2018

January 2018

February - May 2018

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
National Parks/Reserves
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
Concentration of displaced people
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
National Parks/Reserves
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
Concentration of displaced people
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
Concentration of displaced people
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
National Parks/Reserves
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

Key Messages

  • In bimodal areas of Uganda, the November to January second season harvest is complete and average production has supported seasonal declines of staple food prices. In December, the prices of local staple cereals across key markets were well below the same time last year and near the five-year average. Food availability and access are expected to remain normal in most areas throughout the projection period, and Minimal (IPC Phase 1) outcomes will likely continue. 

  • In the cattle corridor districts of Nakasongola, Nakaseke, Kiboga, Mubende, Moroto, and Kotido, natural water resources have been exhausted earlier than normal due to below-average rainfall at the end of the rainy season and current above-average temperatures.  As a result, livestock body conditions are expected to be slightly poorer than normal through the remainder of the dry season, though milk production is still expected to be average. 

  • In Karamoja, food stocks among poor households are seasonally declining and households’ reliance on markets is increasing. However, household purchasing power, as measured by charcoal-to-sorghum terms of trade, is approximately 60 percent below average. Although normal market supplies are expected throughout the projection period, household food access will likely remain below average. Stressed (IPC Phase 2) conditions are expected, although some poor households in parts of Napak, Moroto, and Nakapiripirit will be in Crisis (IPC Phase 3). 

  • The arrival rate of South Sudanese refugees has further declined in December, to approximately 100 refugees per day. Conversely, the number of people seeking refuge from the DRC has increased: 11,435 Congolese have sought refuge in Uganda between December 1 and January 23, roughly 211 people per day. Despite this increase, total refugee numbers are within the 2018 Refugee Response Plan’s projections. Nearly 50 percent of 2018 funding requirements have been met and newly-arrived refugees are expected to continue receiving a full ration through at least April 2018, and the majority will likely be Stressed (IPC Phase 2!). 

About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on some 34 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, and USGS, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica. Read more about our work.

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